Kansas City, Missouri installs sidewalk discs at certain intersections to prevent dangerous side actions – Update Kansas

In Kansas City, there’s a new crackdown on what police call sideshows. Side events are characterized by a group of cars and people blocking an intersection while the driver is doing donuts at that intersection. Kansas City cops put on a big sideshow this past weekend. Officers also found about 100 spent shell casings from spectators who fired guns during the sideshow. A KCPD social media post showed helicopter video from the sideshow and then officers arresting the suspects at another location. “We told people the dangers of this, and this is becoming a law enforcement issue,” said Police Maj. Dave Jackson, commander of the traffic division KCPD. The city’s public works department recently installed a T-series of circular discs at the intersection of 13th Street and Grand Boulevard near the Power & Light District. The Mobile Arena. The discs are designed to stop the lateral movement of tires or donuts. There are skid marks at that intersection where there was donut activity, according to police. “It’s also a particularly dangerous place because you can see the amount of people that are down here,” Jackson said. There have been three recent fatal crashes involving side events in Kansas City, including a pedestrian who was struck and killed in September. A recent police department meeting focused on the problem of collateral damage and how to solve it. The discs are being installed in places where in m in the past there were activities during side events. In addition to arresting drivers at side events, Kansas City police officers issue citations to spectators. The police department said it’s working with the city, including the courts, to hold the perpetrators accountable.” The city has been very supportive, they’ve been a great partner in this. And maybe we could work on stronger consequences for the people who do it. People should be able to walk and use the bike lanes for what they’re meant to be done without selfish actors trying to come down there and take it over. It doesn’t belong to them,” Jackson said. Kansas City Police officers also use stopwatches to slowly deflate the tires of suspected hit-and-run drivers.

In Kansas City, there’s a new crackdown on what cops call a sideshow.

Side events are characterized by a group of cars and people blocking an intersection while the driver does donuts at that intersection.

Kansas City cops put on a big sideshow this past weekend. Officers also recovered about 100 spent shell casings from audience members who fired guns during the sideshow.

A KCPD social media post showed helicopter video from the sideshow and then officers arresting the suspects at another location.

“We’ve been telling people the dangers of this and this is becoming an enforcement issue,” said Police Maj. Dave Jackson, commander of KCPD’s traffic division.

The city’s Department of Public Works recently installed a series of circular discs at the intersection of 13th Street and Grand Boulevard near the Power & Light District and T-Mobile Arena.

Discs are designed to stop lateral movement of tires or donuts. There are skid marks at this intersection where police say there was donut activity.

“It’s also a particularly dangerous place because you can see the amount of people that are down here,” Jackson said.

There have been three recent sideshow-related deaths in Kansas City, including a pedestrian who was struck and killed in September.

A recent police department meeting focused on a secondary problem and how to solve it. Disks are installed in places where secondary activity has taken place in the past.

In addition to arresting sideshow drivers, Kansas City police officers issue citations to spectators. The police department said it is working with the city, including the courts, to hold the perpetrators accountable.

“The city has been very supportive, it’s a great partner in this. And maybe we could work toward some more significant impacts for the people who are doing this. People should be able to walk and use the bike lanes to do what they want.” ‘are meant to be without selfish actors trying to get down there and take it over. They don’t own it,” Jackson said.

Kansas City police also use stopwatches to slowly deflate the tires of suspected drivers.

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