The photographer documents her personal journey with breast cancer

Editor’s Note: Warning The following article contains graphic images.

He created this project Eleonora Ghioldidescribing her experiences during breast cancer treatment.

“We have been sad long enough for this land to either weep or become fertile.”

— Audre Lorde, The Cancer Journals

“Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, causing 685,000 deaths per year worldwide,” I read. “In Argentina, it is estimated that 1 in 8 women who reach the age of 80 will develop the disease at some point in their lives.” The number is shocking, but it is still just one more piece of information compared to the passage of the disease through the body.

All the women in Eleonora's family who had cancer.  The numbers below each correspond to the woman's age when they were diagnosed.  <strong>From left to right:</strong> María, Eleonora’s mother’s aunt, 70;  Julia, Eleanor’s grandmother, 79;  Griselda, Eleanor’s mother, 52;  Coca, Eleonora’s mother’s cousin, 45;  Mariana, Eleonora Mom’s niece, 50;  Eleonora, 44 years old.” srcset=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/8944f26/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1800×768+0+0/resize/1760×750!/quality/90/?url =https%3A%2F%2Fmedia.npr.org%2Fassets%2Fimg%2F2022%2F09%2F27%2Fbreast-cancer-project.001_custom-3c5ffbc1d5c182bf9cb21f05a8d9d8cb24eab247.jpg 2x” width=”880″ height=”375″ src=”https ://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/8e1c294/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1800×768+0+0/resize/880×375!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmedia.npr .org%2Fassets%2Fimg%2F2022%2F09%2F27%2Fbreast-cancer-project.001_custom-3c5ffbc1d5c182bf9cb21f05a8d9d8cb24eab247.jpg” loading=”lazy” bad-src=”data:image/svg+xml;base64,PHN2ZyB4bWxucz0iaHR0cDovL3d3dy53My5vcmcvMjAwMC9zdmciIHZlcnNpb249IjEuMSIgaGVpZ2h0PSIzNzVweCIgd2lkdGg9Ijg4MHB4Ij48L3N2Zz4=”/></picture>
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Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

All the women in Eleonora’s family who had cancer. The numbers below each correspond to the woman’s age when they were diagnosed. From left to right: María, Eleonora’s mother’s aunt, 70; Julia, Eleanor’s grandmother, 79; Griselda, Eleanor’s mother, 52; Coca, Eleonora’s mother’s cousin, 45; Mariana, Eleonora Mom’s niece, 50; Eleanor, 44 years old.
The treatment notes Eleonora collected during that time.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

The treatment notes Eleonora collected during that time.

I had cancer, yes. It’s still hard for me to describe how it feels.

Eleonora at the beginning of her cancer treatment.

/ Eleonora Ghioldi

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Eleonora Ghioldi

Eleonora at the beginning of her cancer treatment.
When we talk about breast cancer prevention, we talk about being able to touch ourselves, to know how, to break the mandate imposed on us from childhood, which says that girls should not touch themselves, that it is wrong, she writes Eleanor.  However, prevention is also autonomy over one's own body.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

When we talk about breast cancer prevention, we talk about being able to touch ourselves, to know how, to break the mandate imposed on us from childhood, which says that girls should not touch themselves, that it is wrong, she writes Eleanor. However, prevention is also autonomy over one’s own body.

Suddenly the world has an expiration date. The first advances. Failures. Fear of not being there for my children. A look into the past, a connection in time with those who once preceded us in this pain.

Eleonora throughout her treatment.

/ Eleonora Ghioldi

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Eleonora Ghioldi

Eleonora throughout her treatment.
Eleonora during regular check-ups.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

Eleonora during regular check-ups.
There will be a moment of silence, sometimes with a gesture of regret, sometimes with the cancer taboo, writes Eleonora.  The "so that no one notices" becomes a strain on bodies undergoing cancer treatment, often focusing on beauty that has little to do with health.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

There will be a moment of silence, sometimes with a gesture of regret, sometimes with the cancer taboo, writes Eleonora. “Not being noticed” becomes a pressure on bodies undergoing cancer treatment, often focusing on beauty demands that have little to do with health.
There are many reasons why women get sick, writes Eleonora - maintaining an insecure life, using pesticides that poison our food, difficulty leading a healthy life and many others we still don't know.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

There are many reasons why women get sick, writes Eleonora – maintaining an insecure life, using pesticides that poison our food, difficulty leading a healthy life and many others we still don’t know.
A cancer diagnosis doesn't always mean death, and cancer treatment doesn't always have to be a place of suffering, writes Eleonora.  The possibilities are many, so it is important to put into words what is going on around this taboo disease.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

A cancer diagnosis doesn’t always mean death, and cancer treatment doesn’t always have to be a place of suffering, writes Eleonora. The possibilities are many, so it is important to put into words what is going on around this taboo disease.
Eleonora's recovery process after mastectomy.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

Eleonora’s recovery process after mastectomy.

Connect — (re)connect — with the body. When you look in the mirror, you find yourself scarred (or not). Western medicine in general and oncology in particular often become labyrinthine paths for most people. This directly affects the decisions we make about our bodies and desires.

The word doctor (that is, in the masculine gender) becomes unique and indecipherable. Satisfied with patriarchal mandates, rushing to get everything back on track, to erase gaps and traces, the medical corporation has returned the body to the path of hegemonic desire. There is a blanket of silence, sometimes with a gesture of regret, sometimes with the taboo of cancer. “Not being noticed” becomes a pressure on bodies receiving cancer treatment, often focusing on beauty demands that have little to do with health.

Flowers from Eleonora's family as a show of support during treatment.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

Flowers from Eleonora’s family as a show of support during treatment.

There is also the struggle that always gives us meaning in the face of so much pain. When we talk about breast cancer prevention, we talk about being able to touch ourselves, knowing how, breaking the mandate imposed on us from childhood that says, “Girls don’t touch their own bodies – that’s wrong.” Prevention is also autonomy. over your own body.

No two cancer journeys are the same, every woman is different. This was mine. My ground for reality was photographing my days; every moment in the hospital was to be documented. Secret, stolen images. That they shouldn’t exist, like my cancer, but they do, they’re real.

Cancer changed my life, photography saved me.

There are many possibilities, which is why it is important to express in words what is happening around this taboo disease, writes Eleonora.  The accompaniment and the way each person chooses to deal with the disease are the pillars of this scaffolding.

Eleonora Ghioldi / Breast Cancer Project

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Breast Cancer Project

There are many possibilities, which is why it is important to express in words what is happening around this taboo disease, writes Eleonora. The accompaniment and the way each person chooses to deal with the disease are the pillars of this scaffolding.

For more Eleonora’s projectsvisit her social networks.

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